A Cupful of Aha! by Anandaa: Book Review

Reviewed for BecomeShakespeare Publication

Title: A Cupful of Aha!

Author: Anandaa

Publisher: BecomeShakespeare

Category: Fiction – General (Novella)

Pages: 54 (It’s almost a pocket-sized book)

Buy from  PublisherFlipkart, Snapdeal, Amazon.com

At Goodreads

Purpose, logic, love, learning, oneness – all about life, through death!

“…Hello,” I said, “Can’t say I’ve seen you around here before.”

She smiled again…and my heart melted. 

“No, you haven’t,” she giggled. “For I have come especially to meet you today. I am Death, and it is time.”

What happens when Death comes for you…and you start arguing over coffee ?

… a quirky tale that offers a whole new perspective into one of life’s deepest mysteries…

(Book Back Cover Text)

He is at a coffee shop. He meets a beautiful lady who, to his shock, introduces herself as death. At once, he realizes he is dead and begins thinking about how is after-life is going to be. He awaits for a life review and probably a judgement of the life he had just lived, anticipating some kind of hell. However, the lady Death, through her clever witty lines makes him understand and re-shape some of his core beliefs about life. That’s what the 54 pages are about – the conversation between them while they take a tour from the coffee shop to some relevant places and reach back to from where they started. The whole idea is to relate simple, day-t0-day situations to the big meanings of life.

To give you an idea of what kind of understanding the book talks about, here’s an instance of their day tour:

She asks him what he knows about love. He tries to explain why he loves someone. Meanwhile, they reach his home where his pets, Bonny and Clyde, run between his legs, making him almost stumble.

“Upstairs, and I mean NOW!” He shouts angrily. They leave him immediately.

He continues to explain love, only to realize that the kind of love he is talking about is a conditional one.

“Hence proved. No love.” She declares.

……. There is nothing I can say to her……And without thinking, whistle again for Bonny and Clyde. I watch as they come bounding down, barking raucously, full of joy. They don’t stop to think that I’d just screamed at them a few minutes ago. No reluctance, no grudges, no complaints, nothing. It’s all forgiven and forgotten – and we’re ready to play again. And then it hits me.

Excerpt from the Book (Page 34)

Courtesy: becomeshakespeare.com

Courtesy: becomeshakespeare.com

The author’s writing style is catchy. There is laudable clarity in the conversations. Though almost the entire book is of conversations, you will never have to go to the lines above to keep a track of who says what. It’s apparent that the book is going to be full of quick wit even before the story begins. Author’s description was enough to do that job. Undoubtedly, the front cover design is impressive as you can see above.

I doubt if the content is! It’s a serious subject, about unraveling the deepest mysteries of life, in a philosophical sense. That part is good. However, the attempt to pack it within 56 small-sized pages proved unrealistic. Also, the idea of talking about a serious subject in a witty way did not do so much of justice. If there was a challenge to present a philosophical subject in a unique perspective through a short fiction, this book would have stood the best. Unfortunately, it wasn’t written for a contest! Of course, from a higher perspective, what the book intends to give the readers is admirable but it could not bring in the depth that this subject should have actually brought about. Though a fiction, it feels as if the book lacks a sense of realism. What saints and sages took years to decode, the main character does in a few minutes by simply staring at a drop of coffee. And that stirs one’s logic, certainly unable to buy ‘logic is a myth’ concept of the author.

Considering the language, writing style and matter of the book, it would have had great potential, had it been a well-framed fiction instead of the condensed version.

By the way, I am still confused if the hero of the plot was dead or alive throughout the narration ❓

Overall,

A cupful of Aha! is a good travel companion which would leave you ponder your own life perspectives for the rest of the travel. If it doesn’t do this, it means you slept half the way.

My thanks to BecomeShakespeare Publication for the review copy.

About the Author

Source (From the Book)

The author is possibly the only double PhD (one in Applied Psychology, the other in Comparative Tribal Music) who has spent multiple stints in several rehabilitation centres for problems ranging from drug abuse, mental breakdown, and schizophrenia. He then spent 8 years roaming the remote regions of the Himalayas – living with goatherds and monks, and often going several months with not a word spoken. At ease with Prime Ministers and commoners alike; he has the unique ability to predict key events of your future just by looking at a photograph of your little finger. PS: None of the above is true. The author is just the average John (or Jani or Janardhan). Does not matter. The message is important; not the messenger. Hope you enjoy the book. 🙂

If you are a publisher, an author or a reader and wish to get your book or a book of your choice to be reviewed in Pages from Serendipity, please send a message to nandhini.pfs@gmail.com

Read other recent book reviews:

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Marvels & Mysteries of the Mahabharata by Abhijit Basu

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Visit the Book Reviews page for review archives

 

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